Lifestyle Tips

life-style choices, chinese body clock, naturopathic lifestyle, natural rhythm, mind and body

Lifestyle Tips for Syncing with the Chinese Body Clock

Are you familiar your body’s natural rhythm?  Did you even know it has one?

According to East Asian medicine, the Chinese body clock (learn more about it here) is a guide to the body’s organic movement of qi (energy) from organ to organ.

And living in sync with it may lead to a healthier and more balanced life.

So how can you do that?

Following are simple, all-day lifestyle tips Dr. Graves has for connecting with the body’s natural rhythm.

5am-7am (Large Intestine): Support bowel movements by drinking 1-2 cups of water upon waking and gently easing into the day.

7am-9am (Stomach): Fuel up with a protein and fiber-filled breakfast that will stabilize blood sugar and satiate.  Add a walk or movement into this time if possible to support digestion.

9am-11am (Spleen): A good time of day to work, concentration can be at its fullest while nutrients are being supplied to the body and mind.

11am-1pm (Heart): Nurture connection to yourself and/or others.  Socialize over lunch or take time to pause and check-in with yourself.  Try meditation or breathing exercises for grounding.

1pm-3pm (Small Intestine): There’s a lot of work going on with digestion during this time so if slight fatigue sets in, opt for less-intense tasks or a lighter work load during this time and/or take time to rest (major fatigue should be looked into further for more support).

3pm-5pm (Bladder): Hydration can be the name of the game at this time.  An afternoon tea, extra glass of water, or freshly made juice can all aid in detoxification through the bladder.  Energy can also get a boost about now, so work or tasks may seem a bit easier than earlier in the afternoon.

5pm-7pm (Kidneys): Slow down, take time to cook, and enjoy a leisurely meal to help the kidneys and adrenal glands calm from the day.

7pm-9pm (Pericardium and Reproductive Organs): Reconnect with the heart – both physically and emotionally.  Do things that help you relax, feel protected, and allow time and space for you to reflect on the day.

9pm-11pm (Triple Burner): At bedtime, many organs are working together to process the day’s activities and emotions while preparing to rest and restore during night.  Winding down with reading, warm herbal tea, cuddling, and evening supplements can be helpful.

11pm-1am (Gall Bladder): Sleep supports the gall bladder in providing bile for future detoxification.

1am-3am (Liver): Cleansing of the body happens during this time so if consistent wake-ups are happening between 1-3am, liver support may be needed.

In addition, exhausted adrenal glands can sometimes cause sleep disruptions during this time. Frequently, they can be calmed with deep breathing techniques and supplements (as well as lifestyle changes throughout the day).

3am-5am (Lungs): A respiratory issue may be at play if sleep is commonly disrupted during this time, but grief and sadness are also prominent.  Work through traumatic experiences and/or address any breathing difficulties.

In today’s busy world it can be difficult to live by nature’s way.  However, slight changes in the way we live and schedule our lives may make a big difference in how we feel.

Are you interested in getting in-sync with your body’s rhythm?

Please call us at (303) 688-6698 or click here to schedule a free 15 minute phone consultation with Dr. Graves to discuss how you personally can do this through acupuncture and naturopathic medicine.

The CNMA office provides naturopathic care, acupuncture, testing, massage, and holistic counseling to those in Castle Rock, Castle Pines, Highlands Ranch, Lone Tree, Centennial, Parker, Larkspur, Monument, Colorado Springs, and the greater Denver metro area.  For those outside of these areas, virtual appointments are available.

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